Christine Hall

Christine HallWho am I? Like most of us, I’m a mix: I’m a nature-loving hiker, artist, wife, mother, scholar, and teacher. I’m Alaska-born, a world traveler, avid reader, lover of God, retreat leader, teacher, organizer, and spiritual director / companion. Oh, and picking blueberries is a highlight of my summer. Go figure.

I’m a long time member of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers), with Roman Catholic roots and an eccumnical spirit. I experience the Divine in wilderness, in quiet, in music, in creative expression, through the Bible, and with others in soulful conversations, prayer, song, and collaborative discernment.

Since 2012, I’ve directed Way of the Spirit—with residential retreats and online sessions to foster awareness of the inner presence and guidance of the Holy. For eight years, I was also adjunct faculty in Seattle University’s School of Theology and Ministry. My teaching flows from the wisdom of the Quaker-Christian tradition.

The most satisfying parts of my efforts in ministry are in supporting others in faithfulness to the Inward Teacher—to partner with God for personal transformation and building up Goodness in our communities.

Christine’s Ministries

Better Uses of Solitude

Better Uses of Solitude

Pondering solitude, I’ve remembered that “alone” isn’t the same as “lonely.” Solitude can be lonely, and through the pandemic we’ve learned far too much about suffering through loneliness. But this week, I’m engaging solitude more as intentional seclusion, a retreat, a withdrawal for re-collection.

Groaning our Prayers

Groaning our Prayers

Guttural, loud, gravelly deep in my throat, resonating in my chest and abdomen, emptying out a big belly breath to the dregs, sometimes a word or two but mostly beyond words—that’s a whole body groan. … I’ve been learning how to integrate groaning with prayer.

Rooted in Spirit

Rooted in Spirit

OVERNIGHT, AN EYE-CATCHING CURLY WILLOW TREE in my front yard crashed to the ground. I’m thankful nothing else was damaged. My family had marveled at its corkscrew branches, but harsh cold, rain, and then wind in the Pacific Northwest finally toppled it. We’ve since learned that Curly Willows have a really shallow root system.